Collage of four photos side by side shows young people read as women and men. They are in this order from left to right: Julian Vogels, Kat Frankie, Nene Opoku, Ceren Türkmen. Julian Vogels smiles frontally into the camera with his lips open. He wears a ring as a lip piercing on the left side and a finely trimmed mustache. He stands in front of a black and red background, wears a black T-shirt with white writing on which only the word "Music" can be clearly read and a beige cap. Next to it is a photo of a woman in a grass-green dress made of crinkled fabric. Kat Frankie sits in the shadows, warm spotlight from the left only slightly illuminating her silhouette. She has her head tilted back to the left and is looking down at the camera from above, mouth closed. She wears a short, blond bob haircut. Her bare right arm is reaching for something on her left side, out of view. Nene Opoku sits in front of a screen-like background, a microphone in her right hand. She is wearing a gray shirt, with a black jacket with a collar and zipper over it. She has tied the top of her head into a palm tree hairstyle, her curls at the tips are blond and she wears silver creoles. She has raised her left hand, pressing her thumb against the fingertips of all five fingers. She looks to the left out of the picture and has opened her lips to speak. There is a close-up of half of Ceren Türkmen's face in black and white. She looks at the camera and smiles slightly with her lips closed. Her dark hair falls over her forehead to the left. She wears a fine plug piercing in her nose.
Julian Vogels, Kat Frankie, Nene Opoku, Ceren Türkmen
Thursday, 25.8.2022
20:00 – 21:00, Haus für Poesie
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»I Have Seen The Future – Talk über Klima und Pop« (De)

Ceren Türkmen (host), Julian Vogels, Kat Frankie, Nene Opoku

No music on a dead planet. But what is the music industry doing to protect the climate? Couldn’t it and shouldn’t it do a lot more? At festivals, where the rubbish in nature just piles up; in electricity consumption with streaming, in the tours of bands? Institutions also continue to award funding without referencing climate guidelines. More and more musicians have the issue on their radar, as Music Declares Emergency shows: The community of artists, organisations and industry players is raising awareness on the climate emergency and calling for immediate action in order to protect the planet and as part of the climate movement. Team member Julian Vogels will discuss this with Nene Opoku from the Black Earth Collective, who wants to make BIPOC perspectives more visible in the White-dominated climate movement, and with artist Kat Frankie, who addresses the climate crisis and activism in her songs. The panel, which also deals with class issues, will be hosted by sociologist and racism researcher Ceren Türkmen.

Supported by Initiative Musik gemeinnützige Projektgesellschaft mbH with project funds from the Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and the Media (BKM) as part of Pop-Kultur Inter:national / Postmigrant Perspectives.

Collage of four photos side by side shows young people read as women and men. They are in this order from left to right: Julian Vogels, Kat Frankie, Nene Opoku, Ceren Türkmen. Julian Vogels smiles frontally into the camera with his lips open. He wears a ring as a lip piercing on the left side and a finely trimmed mustache. He stands in front of a black and red background, wears a black T-shirt with white writing on which only the word "Music" can be clearly read and a beige cap. Next to it is a photo of a woman in a grass-green dress made of crinkled fabric. Kat Frankie sits in the shadows, warm spotlight from the left only slightly illuminating her silhouette. She has her head tilted back to the left and is looking down at the camera from above, mouth closed. She wears a short, blond bob haircut. Her bare right arm is reaching for something on her left side, out of view. Nene Opoku sits in front of a screen-like background, a microphone in her right hand. She is wearing a gray shirt, with a black jacket with a collar and zipper over it. She has tied the top of her head into a palm tree hairstyle, her curls at the tips are blond and she wears silver creoles. She has raised her left hand, pressing her thumb against the fingertips of all five fingers. She looks to the left out of the picture and has opened her lips to speak. There is a close-up of half of Ceren Türkmen's face in black and white. She looks at the camera and smiles slightly with her lips closed. Her dark hair falls over her forehead to the left. She wears a fine plug piercing in her nose.
Julian Vogels, Kat Frankie, Nene Opoku, Ceren Türkmen